Max Hunter

hunter-max

Assistant Professor of Biology
Coordinator of PPHS
BA, University of Washington, 2002
MA, Harvard University, 2006
MEd, Harvard University, 2007
MA, University of Washington, 2013
PhD, University of Washington, 2011

Emailhuntem1@spu.edu
Office: Eaton 308

Max Hunter came to Seattle Pacific after spending six years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with his wife and three of their now four children. Dr. Hunter received his PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington, and two master's degrees, in history of science and in education, from Harvard University. More recently, he completed a master’s from the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM), where he supports the medical school admissions staff.

Dr. Hunter’s teaching and research focus on the intersection of identity and health as well as diversity in education. While at Harvard, historian of medicine Charles Rosenberg supervised his thesis in bioethics: “In the Belly of the Whale: An exploration of the meaning of American Bioethics.” He deepened his examination of health activism in American bioethics while at UWSOM under the guidance of Professors Sara Goering and Malia Fullerton. In his thesis, “Between Ratchet and Respectability: Transforming American Bioethics in the Age of Hip Hop,” he sought to expose how class and social cleavages impeded the success of health campaigns in the African-American community.

As a graduate student in educational leadership, Dr. Hunter pursued the experience of African-Americans and other students in higher education. His dissertation, “Ambivalence and Transformation in Black Male Literacy Narratives: Grounds for Reaching Out to Black Males,” exposes and puts into historical context the experience of the ambivalence black males might experience regarding literacy. In doing so, Dr. Hunter seeks not only to understand the roots and perpetuation of this ambivalence in an abstract form, but also to examine his own literacy narrative. In conclusion, this dissertation proposes a new path for helping African-American males examine, embrace, and employ their ambivalence in a constructive manner that will help them acquire literacy.

At SPU, Dr. Hunter teaches biology and pre-professional health sciences courses. He serves as the coordinator for the Pre-Professional Health Sciences Program.

For more information, please see Dr. Hunter's CV (PDF).