1100 Offerings

There are dozens of different sections of WRI 1100, which gives both students and faculty a lot of leeway in charting a course of study.  All sections adhere to the same description, outcomes, and standards, so students can expect some level of consistency between course offerings.

This course is not intended to be an introduction-to-the-major.  If you are a biology major but unable to get into a biology section of the course, it is not a problem.  The critical thinking skills you'll learn of researching, evaluating sources, synthesizing ideas, positioning your ideas among others, and interpreting data (whether a text or numbers or field research), will carry into whatever major you choose.

Here are the topics offered 2018-2019:

Aaberg: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a Nursing professor, explores diseases that affect reproductive health.

Achterman: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a Communication-Journalism professor, explores how our “always on” technological life is both valued and criticized.

Beers: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an education professor, considers the ways smartphones, tablets, and the Internet have changed reading and writing.

Copeland: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a family and consumer sciences professor, explores the dynamic role of various social media platforms in forming identities for public consumption.

Davis: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a political science professor, considers the different types of writing necessary in the business world.  However, familiarity with these writing styles will be of interest even to non-business majors as well.

Doty: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a business professor, considers how business practice is related to customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and public benefit.

Ediger: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a political science professor, considers the global community’s treatment of refugees and internally displaced peoples.

Hansen: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an English professor, will focus on the ideas of difference and monstrousness through reading and writing about Frankenstein.

Hunter: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a biology professor, engages students in analyzing the normative ethical questions that have emerged, and continue to occur, among those interested in curing illness and disease in the health care arena.

Keuss: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a theology professor, will look at the Oxford Inklings (CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien, Dorothy Sayers, Charles Williams) and how writing serves as a way to address the reality of evil in contemporary cultures.

L. Holmes: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a Theology professor, combines English and Theology to consider how theological themes are developed in fantasy literature in order to shape the imagination and action of readers.

C. Hughes: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a music professor, will study instrumental and vocal music and how to write about each.

Lorig: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a Theatre professor, considers the ways society influences and is influenced by the arts, in the past, present, and future.

McFarland: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a biochemistry professor, analyzes how science is written in different ways for different audiences.

Mondesir: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a sociology professor, will explore how systems of inequality, power, and privilege are created and maintained via the interactions of class, gender, and race.

Overstreet: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a film critic, will invite students into critical conversations about cinema, focusing particularly on international and independent films that cultivate cross-cultural empathy.

P. Moe: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an English professor, will study public memory--why we memorialize what we do and what we choose to forget.

Plett: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an engineering professor, explores topics related to alternative energies. Students will learn and practice the technical writing employed by engineers.

Pratt: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a biology professor, examines how new discoveries change the scientific and popular understanding of infectious diseases.

R. Holmes: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a music professor, explores regional differences in North American music.

Reinsma: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an English professor, will explore the wonky, sci-fi/detective fiction of Haruki Murakami, Japan’s most popular modern novelist.

Roe: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an engineering professor, explores topics related to sustainable energy systems and community development. Students will learn and practice the technical writing employed by engineers.

Ryder: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a theatre professor, explores the aesthetic experience of art through the intersection between the artist and the audience.

Webb: This section of WRI 1100, offered by a psychology professor, allows students the opportunity to explore research in social science.

Willett: This section of WRI 1100, offered by an English professor, considers the way that artistic productions—sculpture, painting, poetry, short stories—provide venues for thinking about God, faith, and everything else in the world.