BE WELL: MINDFUL YOGA

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Do Yoga | Learn Mindfulness | Be Well

THURSDAYS
7:15 PM
MOYER 3.0 LOUNGE

Be Well is a 4-week series of yoga classes that integrate mindfulness meditation. Each week, students will be led in a yoga class followed by a mindfulness practice. Students will also be provided with information about stress management and resources to develop a mindfulness meditation practice. Sign up at imleagues.com/spu, and bring your own yoga mat.
Session 1: April 7, 14, 21, & 28
Session 2: May 5, 12, 19, & 26

For further information please contact Karly Murphy at karlymary@spu.edu

Self-Care during Finals

Finals week can be one of the most stressful times of the semester. Eating, exercise, and sleep all have an impact on how we function-this is especially important during finals week. We want to make sure that you can keep yourself going.

Self-Care-Wheel-English

It’s essential to maintain balance and cover all areas of self-care: physical, psychological, emotional, spiritual, personal, and professional. This wheel is not an exhaustive list of way to self-care; there are many more options that are right for you.

 

Why is self-care so important? In addition to breaking the cycle of stress, self-care helps us increase our positive feelings towards others and ourselves. It improves our confidence and self-esteem. Interpersonally, it helps us to establish boundaries with other people and keeps relationships healthier.

We hope you have a good finals week and a great spring break!

What is depression?

We’ve talked about what people think depression is or what having depression means, but what’s the real truth? This video talks about the actual symptoms of depression and how you can start to overcome them, or continue reading below:

What is depression? People experience depression symptoms differently, but for all individuals, depression affects day-to-day functioning. Depression also affects emotions, behaviors, and how you think.

Signs of depression include:

  • Feeling sad most of the day
  • Changes in appetite, resulting in weight loss or gain
  • Changes in sleep, either inability to fall asleep or sleeping too much
  • Feeling fatigued or increased loss of energy
  • Losing interest or pleasure in activities
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
  • Low self-esteem
  • Difficulty concentrating and making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

 

If you think you might be depressed, you can contact the SPU Counseling Center for more information on treating depression or see your primary care physician. Even though it may seem difficult, it’s important to get help as soon as possible.

Misconceptions about Depression

Depression is a common mental illness, especially among college students. Around 44% of college students experience symptoms of depression at some point during their college time. However, there are also many misconceptions about depression that make it seem like having depression makes you a bad person or that you’ll never succeed in college.

Check out the video to learn about some common myths about depression, or continue reading:

Myth #1: Depression means that you’re just feeling down or sad- it’s not a big deal.

Truth: There’s a big difference between clinical depression and feeling sad AND clinical depression is a real and serious illness that greatly affects a person’s life. Depression can last from two weeks to several years, and in any form is a serious mental illness that needs treatment. For college students, depression may result in withdrawing from important friends or activities, having difficulty completing school work, and taking dangerous risks.

Myth #2: Depression is something you are stuck with and you can’t treat it.

Truth: It is possible to get effective help for clinical depression. You can seek out a range of possibilities, including therapy or medication.

Myth #3: Depressed people are lazy- they just need to pull themselves together and stop being depressed.

Truth: People who are clinically depressed can’t “snap out of it” anymore than someone with a medical illness can. There are some biological components to depression, such as an imbalance of certain brain chemicals. Without effective treatment, it would nearly impossible for someone to stop being depressed.

Myth #4: Only girls get depression.

Truth: Though women are more likely to admit to feeling depressed, there are many men who likely also have clinical depression. Sometimes it can be harder for men to talk about feelings and experiences that go along with clinical depression

Myth #5: The best treatment for depression is antidepressant medication.

Truth: Antidepressants are one form of effect treatment for clinical depression. For college students, a combination of antidepressants and therapy, or counseling, is likely to be most helpful. There are several types of therapy that have shown to be effective for treating depression.

Helping out our friends

College is stressful for everyone, but you aren’t in it alone. We want to be able to support our friends when they are having difficult times or are feeling stressed out. Sometimes it can be difficult to figure out how to talk to friends when we notice there may be a problem. It can also be hard to tell when a friend needs extra support, from just developing better stress management skills or if the person is dealing with a more significant problem.

Some common signs that a friend might need help include:

  • Depression or sadness that interferes with obligations
  • Inability to cope with day-to-day problems
  • Extreme highs, shown by burst of energy, sleeplessness, or compulsive behavior
  • Severe and frequent anxiety and stress
  • Increased use of alcohol or drugs

How do you respond?

Depending on your relationship with that person, you may be able to talk to the person one-on-one or you may want to let someone else know about the problem, like a professor or a resident assistant. Remember that you aren’t a therapist and you’re not responsible for solving your friend’s problems. However, you do want to be supportive of the person and encourage them to reach out to family, the counseling center, or another medical professional.

What do you say?

Try to be patient and supportive of your friend. Even if you don’t understand the problem, you can still be compassionate and listen. Here are some things you can say to a friend:

  • We all go through tough times.
  • You can feel better. Even though it doesn’t seem like it now, reaching out for help is a first step.
  • It’s ok to ask for help. There are many resources available on campus to provide support for students.

Stress and your mind

Keeping our stress in check is difficulty with the constant pressures of college. Sometimes stress can serve to motivate us, but too much stress for too long can have detrimental effects on our minds and our bodies. The video below explains how stress can be good- and bad.

 

There are ways to combat stress- some of these things we can integrate into our daily routine to help manage stress.

  • Time management. Plan ahead to make sure you’ve scheduled enough time for your schoolwork and other obligations.
  • Take one thing at a time. Deal with one urgent task at a time, and then move to the next. When overwhelmed, don’t try to do everything at once.
  • Be realistic. Know when you can’t handle anymore on your plate and don’t be afraid to saw no to new activities.
  • Taking 5 to 10 minutes a day for quiet reflection can bring some relief. After a stressful day, find a quiet place to breathe deeply for a few minutes or go for a walk to clear your mind.
  • Thirty minutes of physical activity per day helps both the body and mind.
  • Take a break. Sometimes it’s necessary to take a break and do something you enjoy.
  • Share your feelings. Don’t try to cope alone. Let family, friends, or someone on campus know you need support or guidance.

 

Source

Breathing through stress

Diaphragmatic breathing is a breathing technique that helps to increase oxygen in the body and decrease stress. When we’re stressed, we tend to only use the upper part of our lungs, or breathing with our upper chest. This shallow breathing causes a disruption in the balance of carbon dioxide and oxygen in our bodies and increases our anxiety.

Diaphragmatic breathing can be done at any time, and anywhere. You can check out the this link for guided breathing instructions or follow the simple list of steps.

DiaphragmBreathing

  1. First, begin by breathing at your normal pace, inhaling and exhaling through the nose or exhaling through pursed lips.
  2. Rest one hand lightly on your abdomen just below your ribcage and one hand on your upper chest.
  3. As you inhale slowly, feel your stomach move outwards. When you exhale, feel your stomach sink inward. The hand on your chest should stay as still as possible.
  4. Continue to take deep breaths, feeling your stomach rise and fall. If you’re having trouble at first, try exaggerating the movements of your stomach.
  5. After awhile, you begin to feel more relaxed.

What does stress look like?

 

StressGraphic

A certain level of stress is normal for everyone, especially college students. However, too much for too long may interfere with your academic performance and cause both physical and emotional issues. Here are some signs that your stress level might be crossing into an unhealthy zone:

  • Taking longer to fall asleep or waking up tired
  • Changes in eating patterns
  • Increased frequency of headaches
  • Feeling more short-tempered
  • Recurring colds or minor illnesses
  • Muscles aches or tightness
  • Feeling more disorganized than usual
  • Increased difficulty in task completion
  • A greater sense of persistent time pressure
  • Increased generalized frustration and anger

If any of these signs persist for several weeks, you can try some stress management techniques, or reach out to someone on campus for support. Next week, we’ll bring you information on some easy techniques that will help manage your stress.

Welcome to Wellness

College is a difference experience for everyone. It’s easy to get caught up in class schedules, sports, clubs, volunteer work, homework, studying, and friends and forget about our own emotional, physical, and mental health. The SPU Wellness Initiative wants to help you in your journey through college and all address all the difficulties that you might face. Over the next few months, we’ll be bringing you information on stress, mental illness, and how to recognize and cope with those issues. Check back here for weekly updates!