Burnout

National Nurse’s Week (May 6-12) not only recognizes the contribution of practicing nurses but also the high demands placed on nursing students. Nursing students must balance a rigorous curriculum with long hospital shifts, all while working and attempting to maintain a school/life balance.

Burnout is physical and emotional exhaustion. While stress is common and can dampen how your behavior and how you feel, burnout is worse – it’s prolonged and chronic stress related to work and/or school. Burnout can involve feelings of hopelessness, flattened emotions, and little to no motivation to do well at the job you once cared about. Burnout not only affects how you feel and behave personally, but it impacts your performance and can have harmful consequences. With such long hours and high emotional stress, caring professions, like nursing, are especially susceptible to burnout.

Paying attention to how you’re feeling is one of the first steps to recognizing burnout. It’s important to understand where the burnout is coming from. Often, in caring professions, empathy can lead to burnout. While empathy is an admirable trait and critical to performing well in caring professions, it can also increase emotional stress, especially in healthcare. Long shifts without breaks and packed schedules without any time for self-care can also lead to burnout. Lastly, neglecting who you are outside of your profession can be detrimental – you are more than your career!

When working in caring profession, we want to give our all for to our patients, clients, training, and to our own professional development. It is so important that we remember that to give our all, we have to firstly take care of ourselves. We must give ourselves the same kindness we provide to others so that we can be the caring, present, and competent professionals we strive to be!

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