Kiah Jones: 6&7

Yazidi Kurdish women chant slogans during a protest against the Islamic State group's invasion on Sinjar city one year ago, in Dohuk, northern Iraq, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015. Thousands of Yazidi Kurdish women and girls have been sold into sexual slavery and forced to marry Islamic State militants, according to Human Rights organizations, Yazidi activists and observers. (AP Photo/Seivan M.Salim)

Yazidi Kurdish women chant slogans during a protest against the Islamic State group's invasion on Sinjar city one year ago, in Dohuk, northern Iraq, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Seivan M.Salim)

6. Protest is not only political and economic, but also fits within a “paradigm of political bloom” (xvii). What are the three factors in this paradigm or model?

Protests show aspects of political bloom that are not simply political or economic but also shed light on gender locations, social contestation, and artistic revision. This modern perspective on the importance of protests is set within careful appreciation. Although these cultural forms are not always associated with extreme revolts, neither are they exclusively political.

Instead, contemporary protest specifically displays the ways that individuals engage in diverse ways to the status quo. More importantly, it is an expression of who is choosing to act. In this way, gender locations can be seen. The creativity of these with new technology and constantly evolving options for public participation in cultural forms demonstrations artistic revision. Finally, social contestation is seen in this widened view of political bloom as larger numbers of society engage in resistance, mourning, or other forms of story-telling.

7. What are the images after 9/11?

The images in Western media of the Middle East, post- 9/11 were, to no small extent, filtered. Portrayal of violence, protests, and gender from the media created a story that denied the differences within specifically gender. As mentioned by Kelly Oliver, after 9/11, there was little attention given to the women in war or their protests or soldiers but instead their sexual abuse. This created a “willful ignorance” and constructed an illusion of the outside world to the American audience. The Western lens on Islamic gender became very narrow, dismissing many educated women who wore casual blue-jeans. Instead, there was a focus on the tortured Iraqis, the shallow definitions of their lives, and little attention to the complexities of the issues.

This single-storied perspective was not isolated to just gender. Instead, the blind media coverage also portrayed images of segregated sects of religion and politics. It is important to recognize that the American media’s reaction to 9/11 was not only gendered but also shallow in its appreciation for the complexities of democracy, resistance, and protest in the Middle East. Through both gender and religion, the post-9/11 images can be seen as simple single-storied and bias. However, it is also noted that the public is a complex voice in itself, and many media forms offered apologies or added counter-narratives. In general, the images of post 9/11 were in no way, fair to the true story of the Middle East.

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